New Congressional Research Service Report Shows:Congressional Inaction Results in Majority of Homeland Funds Still Distributed Without Basis of Threat

Dec 14, 2004
Press Release

WASHINGTON, DC - While New York City will receive more than $207 million in funds for high-threat cities, up from $47 million last year, more than half of the $2.5 billion in homeland security dollars already announced for this year has been distributed without any basis of threat, according to a new report from the Congressional Research Service (CRS) made available today. Of the remaining $2.4 billion yet to be distributed, only the $315 million in the remaining funds to be distributed by the Urban Area Security Initiative is guaranteed to be distributed solely based on threat. The result will be a lowering in New York’s per capita share of homeland funds throughout the year.

To view the CRS Report: https://maloney.house.gov/sites/maloney.house.gov/files/documents/olddocs/Homeland/CRS12132004.pdf

The funds yet to be distributed include:

• $315 million for the Urban Area Security Initiative ($150 million for rail security grants, $150 million in port security grants, $10 million in intercity bus security grants and $5 million in trucking industry security grants)
• $934 million in Center for Disease Control Grants
• $650 in FIRE Act grants
• $65 million in SAFER Act grants
• $495 million in Health Resources and Services Administration Grants

Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney (NY), Chair of the Democratic Task Force on Homeland Security, said, “New York finally got a fair share of high-threat homeland aid, but we can expect our per capita ranking to remain low because all other homeland funds will still be distributed like pork barrel, rather than by threat. As this CRS report indicates, one of the major issues still to be addressed by Congress is the 9/11 Commission recommendation to distribute funds based on risk. Regrettably, the 9/11 Intelligence Bill set to be signed into law this week by the President does nothing to revamp a broken system.”

HIGHLIGHTS OF THE CRS REPORT

‘HIGH THREAT’ GRANTS INCREASE FOR NEW YORK

New York State received a $150.8 million increase in funds this year through the ‘high threat’ program, officially called the Urban Area Securities Initiative (UASI). The State received $214.7 million for 2005, compared with $63.9 million through the grant program in 2004. Of these funds, New York City is slated to receive more than $207 million, with an additional $6.3 million earmarked for non-profits involved in Homeland Security initiatives in the City, while Buffalo will receive $7.2 million. In 2004, New York City received just $47 million in UASI funds. (Table 3, CRS 17-18)

‘STATE GRANT’ REDUCED FOR NEW YORK

While high-threat funds for the City and State increased this year, funds to New York through the State Homeland Security Grant Program (SHSGP) went down $37.9 million, from $87.3 billion in 2004 to $49.4 million in 2005. (Table 2, CRS 14-16) This allocation is based on a formula that guarantees each state 0.75% and each territory 0.25%. DHS has decided to allocate the remainder based on population and without regard to risk. (CRS-4)

OTHER HOMELAND GRANT FUNDS DETAILED

In addition to “high-threat” grants and “state” grants, the CRS report details funds to states through four other Homeland Security grant programs, including the Law Enforcement Terrorism Prevention Program (LETPP), the Citizen Corps Program (CCP), Emergency Management Performance Grants (EMPG), and Metropolitan Medical Response System grants (MMRS). Like the ‘State Grant’ these funds are distributed by a formula that does not account for risk. (CRS-4) (A description of these programs can be found on CRS-3)

For 2005, New York received: LETPP, $18 million; CCP, $600,000; EMPG, $8.1 million; MMRS, $1.1 million. (Table 2, CRS 14-18)

HIGHLIGHT FROM PREVIOUS CRS REPORT ON HOMELAND FUNDING

NEW YORK STATE’S PER CAPITA RANK LIKELY TO REMAIN LOW

In 2004, New York State ranked 35th in Homeland Security aid per capita, at $10.03 per person, behind Alaska ($35.00), North Dakota ($34.83), Vermont ($34.83), Delaware ($27.25), South Dakota ($27.00) and 29 other states (Table 5, CRS 21-23).

Since more than $2 billion in 2005 Homeland Security funds have not been allocated yet to states, it is too early to estimate New York’s per capita rank for the year. Most of the remaining funds will NOT go out based on an assessment of threat levels, however, so it is widely anticipated that New York’s per capita rank will drop throughout the year.

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