​Maloney, Never Again Education Act Co-Leads Call for Funds to Be Appropriated

Jun 4, 2020
Press Release

Today, Congresswoman Carolyn B. Maloney, sponsor of the Never Again Education Act which was signed into law last week, was joined by bill co-leads Representatives Elise Stefanik (R-NY), Saul Carbajal (D-CA), and Don Bacon (R-NE) in requesting that the Committee on Appropriations including funding for the bill’s programming for Fiscal Year 2021.

In their letter, to Chairwoman Nita Lowey, Ranking Member Kay Granger, and Subcommittee on Interior, Environment and Related Agencies Chairwoman Betty McCollum, and Ranking Member David Joyce, the members write, “Learning about the enormous historical significance of the Holocaust is a vital part of a well-rounded educational experience. Unfortunately, far too many students in our country grow up without basic knowledge of the events that took place during the Holocaust. The lessons of the Holocaust do not just apply to antisemitism – but to all forms of hate and bigotry and there is no better way to honor the memories of those murdered than to make sure our students know their names and their stories. It is more important than ever that we provide and improve Holocaust education in schools, which is why we worked to pass this legislation to expand the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum’s already outstanding educational programming, and require the Museum to develop and disseminate accurate, relevant, and accessible resources to teachers across the country to promote understanding about how and why the Holocaust happened. This will enable the Museum to build on the incredible work it has done for more than 30 years to build and support the field of Holocaust education.”

Full text of the letter below and a PDF can be found here.

Dear Chairwoman Lowey, Ranking Member Granger, Chairwoman McCollum, and Ranking Member Joyce:

We write to respectfully request that, as the Committee works on the Fiscal Year 2021 Appropriations bill for Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies, that you provide the full $2 million dollars in funding for education programs at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum recently authorized by H.R. 943, the Never Again Education Act. While we understand the Subcommittee has already begun work on the FY2021 appropriations bills, H.R. 943 was signed into law on May 29, 2020, and includes a funding authorization for Fiscal Year 2021.

We are grateful for the co-sponsorship and support of the Chairwoman and the Ranking Member of the full Committee, and the Chairwoman and Ranking Member of the Subcommittee. As you know, H.R. 943 passed the House by an overwhelming bipartisan vote of 393 to 5 on January 27, 2020, International Holocaust Remembrance Day. On May 13, 2020, the Senate passed it by unanimous consent, and on May 29, 2020, the President signed the Never Again Education Act into law. 

In recent years, we’ve seen an increase of anti-Semitic incidents and online harassment. In its annual audit, the Anti-Defamation League reported that 2019 had the highest number of anti-Semitic incidents in any year since they began tracking four decades ago. This was a 12% increase from 2018. On October 27, 2018, eleven Jews were killed on Shabbat simply for being in synagogue and practicing their faith. This attack is believed to be the deadliest on the American Jewish community in our nation’s history. This is horrific and unconscionable. As we condemn these horrendous attacks and the anti-Semitism that motivated them, we also must ensure that our children and students understand the dangers of rising anti-Semitism and that they know its history. For if we do not learn from the past, we are doomed to repeat it. 

Learning about the enormous historical significance of the Holocaust is a vital part of a well-rounded educational experience. Unfortunately, far too many students in our country grow up without basic knowledge of the events that took place during the Holocaust. The lessons of the Holocaust do not just apply to antisemitism – but to all forms of hate and bigotry and there is no better way to honor the memories of those murdered than to make sure our students know their names and their stories. It is more important than ever that we provide and improve Holocaust education in schools, which is why we worked to pass this legislation to expand the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum’s already outstanding educational programming, and require the Museum to develop and disseminate accurate, relevant, and accessible resources to teachers across the country to promote understanding about how and why the Holocaust happened. This will enable the Museum to build on the incredible work it has done for more than 30 years to build and support the field of Holocaust education.

It is critical that we fully fund this expanded programming. We respectfully request that you provide the full $2 million authorized by the Never Again Education Act, an increase from the FY20 enacted level of $60.388 million for the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum. We thank the Subcommittee for its consideration of this request and partnership in providing adequate support to teachers that enables them to incorporate historically accurate instruction on human rights atrocities, including the Holocaust.

 

Thank you for your attention to this request.

 

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