Maloney Hails Funding for Second Ave. Subway, East Side Access

Jul 14, 2009
Press Release

 Washington, D.C. – Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney (D-NY) today hailed the inclusion of $197 million for the Second Avenue Subway and $215 million for East Side Access in the Fiscal Year 2010 House Transportation Appropriations bill. The House is expected to pass the appropriations bill by the end of the month. Maloney has long championed the transit projects, which will be located almost entirely within her congressional district.


“The Second Avenue Subway and East Side Access are continuing to move forward with help from the federal government,” said Maloney. “On their first day in operation, these two projects will move more people than the entire transit systems of most other major American cities. I thank Chairmen John Olver and David Obey and their colleagues on the House Appropriations Committee for their ongoing commitment to funding the Second Avenue Subway and East Side Access, which will be huge boosts for our region’s economy.”


Earlier this year, Maloney issued a report outlining the jobs and other economic benefits created by the construction of the Second Avenue Subway and East Side Access. Both projects are located almost entirely within Maloney’s congressional district. Please click here for a full copy of Maloney’s report; highlights can be found below.


Highlights of Maloney’s Report:
● Every dollar spent on public infrastructure increases GDP by an estimated $1.59.
● Second Avenue Subway has already:
● Created 16,000 jobs
● Generated $842 million in wages
● Produced $2.87 billion in economic activity
● East Side Access has already:
● Created 22,000 jobs
● Generated $1.176 billion in wages
● Produced $4 billion in economic activity
● During construction:
● Second Avenue Subway will generate $4.347 billion in economic activity
● East Side Access will generate $12.275 billion in economic activity
● Following completion, these projects will save commuting time in the region with the longest commutes in the nation.
● Transit projects generate approximately 570 direct and indirect jobs for every $10 million in capital expenditures
● Transit projects generate roughly $30 million in sales for every $10 million in capital expenditures.


Background


In November 2007, the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) and the MTA signed a full-funding grant agreement for the Second Avenue Subway, which will provide $1.3 billion in federal funds to build the subway’s first leg. In February 2009, Congress passed an omnibus appropriations bill that included a $277.7 million funding installment for the subway.


In December 2006, the FTA and the MTA signed a full-funding grant agreement for East Side Access, which will provide $2.6 billion in federal funds for the project. February’s appropriations bill also included $209.6 million for East Side Access.


Full-funding grant agreements are commitments by the federal government to provide a total amount of funding, delivered in installments, over the life of a project.


In the mid-1990s, Rep. Maloney began a campaign to resuscitate the Second Avenue Subway after the project had lain dormant for decades. The subway project, as planned, would run primarily through the 14th Congressional District, which Maloney represents.


The full-length Second Avenue Subway will be an 8 ½ mile two-track line beginning at 125th street and ending in Hanover Square in lower Manhattan. The subway’s first segment will include stops at 96th, 86th and 72nd Streets, and tunnels from 99th to 62nd Streets. At 63rd Street, the new subway line will link onto the existing Q-line tracks, providing a one-seat ride from the Upper East Side to Times Square, Wall Street, and Brooklyn. Construction of the full-length subway has been divided into four phases.

Once completed, the first subway phase will carry more than 200,000 riders each day and relieve massive congestion on the most overcrowded subway routes in the nation: the 4, 5, and 6 Lexington Avenue IRT trains on Manhattan's East Side.


East Side Access will bring the Long Island Rail Road to Grand Central Terminal, carrying approximately 163,000 average weekday boardings.


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