9/11 worker blasts Va. lawmaker whose bill slashes funds for first responders: 'Congressman Goodlatte, you’re an a--hole'

Nov 2, 2015
In The News

A 9/11 cleanup worker who lost part of his foot at Ground Zero on Monday stood at the site of the terror attack and called the Virginia congressman trying to water down a bill that would help first responders “an a--hole.”

“I’m going to say what is on everybody else’s mind — Congressman (Bob) Goodlatte, you’re an a--hole,” said John Feal, one of the country’s fiercest advocates for 9/11 first responders.

The harsh words, which he said at a rally to pressure Congress to permanently fund health and compensation programs for those injured on 9/11, at first briefly stunned the crowd.

But a few people started clapping and then many of the crowd of around 50 people cheered him on.

A 9/11 cleanup worker who lost part of his foot at Ground Zero on Monday stood at the site of the terror attack and called the Virginia congressman trying to water down a bill that would help first responders “an a--hole.”

“I’m going to say what is on everybody else’s mind — Congressman (Bob) Goodlatte, you’re an a--hole,” said John Feal, one of the country’s fiercest advocates for 9/11 first responders.

The harsh words, which he said at a rally to pressure Congress to permanently fund health and compensation programs for those injured on 9/11, at first briefly stunned the crowd.

But a few people started clapping and then many of the crowd of around 50 people cheered him on.

A 9/11 cleanup worker who lost part of his foot at Ground Zero on Monday stood at the site of the terror attack and called the Virginia congressman trying to water down a bill that would help first responders “an a--hole.”

“I’m going to say what is on everybody else’s mind — Congressman (Bob) Goodlatte, you’re an a--hole,” said John Feal, one of the country’s fiercest advocates for 9/11 first responders.

The harsh words, which he said at a rally to pressure Congress to permanently fund health and compensation programs for those injured on 9/11, at first briefly stunned the crowd.

But a few people started clapping and then many of the crowd of around 50 people cheered him on.

“You can’t have a five-year funding level for cancer. You need to have a permanent program.”

She said it is especially important because many of the people who are eligible to be treated under the Zadroga Act are just now getting diagnosed with 9/11-related illnesses.

Meanwhile, at a separate press conference, Mayor de Blasio blasted Congress for once again making 9/11 victims and first responders come begging for help.

“Unfortunately for some in the Congress they're putting politics and ideology ahead of the needs of our first responders,” he said.

“That's never acceptable. This has to be addressed.”

He said he’d work with city elected officials in Washington to pressure Congress to pass a fair bill on Zadroga.