Homeland Security

Nobody knows the importance of homeland security better than New Yorkers. Congresswoman Maloney is working to ensure New York is prepared for, and working to prevent, future terrorist attacks. This includes making sure the Department of Homeland Security is adequately funded and that these funds are invested in areas based on risk and vulnerability, first responders are well trained, equipped, and cared for, and major terrorist targets like New York City are prepared and protected.

Select Highlights

  • Homeland Security Funding and Protecting New York: Since 9/11, Congresswoman Maloney has led a number of efforts in Congress to direct a greater share of homeland security funding to the communities under threat, which too often are shortchanged. Congresswoman Maloney continues to strongly support the recommendation of the 9/11 Commission that homeland security should be based strictly on an assessment of risk and vulnerability, and that New York City and Washington, D.C. should be at the top of any such list. Read More
  • 9/11 Health and Compensation: On January 2, 2011, President Obama Signed the James Zadroga 9/11 Health and Compensation Act (H.R. 847) into law. Congresswoman Maloney spent nearly a decade fighting to pass this important law, which has provided medical monitoring, treatment, and compensation to those sick and injured from the September 11th attacks. Read More
  • Foreign Acquisitions and National Security: Congresswoman Maloney authored the National Security Foreign Investment Reform and Strengthened Transparency Act of 2007 (Public Law 110-49). This legislation strengthens and reforms the process by which the interagency Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS) reviews foreign direct investment for national security issues. The need for this reform was made evident in early 2006 when CFIUS failed to raise red flags about a deal that would have put commercial control of several key U.S. ports into the hands of a company owned by the government of Dubai. This Act establishes CFIUS in statute rather than as a creature of Executive Order, implements mandatory 45-day investigations for all deals involving foreign governments, requires high-level review of such transactions, gives the Director of National Intelligence a greater role in the CFIUS process, and improves congressional oversight, among other provisions.
  • Civil Liberties Board: As the co-chair of the former 9/11 Commission Caucus, Congresswoman Maloney fully supported the passage of all 41 recommendations of the 9/11 Commission. Out of concern that the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board was not given the teeth it needs to be an effective board, she introduced “The Protection of Civil Liberties Act”. This bill would have created the board as recommended by the 9/11 Commission. In 2007 Congress passed H.R. 1, “Implementing the Recommendations of the 9/11 Commission Act of 2007” (P.L. 110-53), which included important provisions from Congresswoman Maloney’s legislation intended to strengthen the Privacy and Civil Liberties Board to more closely reflect the  recommendations of the 9/11 Commission.

For other legislation and related documents click here.

More on Homeland Security

Dec 6, 2001 Press Release

WASHINGTON: Today, Congresswoman Carolyn B. Maloney (NY), Congressman Bart Stupak (MI), and fellow members of Congress announced the Empowering Local First Responders to Fight Terrorism Act of 2001. The legislation provides matching federal grants over ten years to help police, fire, and EMS units respond to terrorism threats and prepare for emergency response.

Pages