Skin Cancer Prevention

Skin Cancer Prevention

In 2007, Congresswoman Maloney introduced the Tanning Accountability and Notification (TAN) Act, which would require the Food and Drug Administration to determine whether the current labeling of indoor tanning beds provides sufficient information about the risks associated with indoor tanning. While many people understand that tanning outside is harmful, they often mistakenly believe that tanning in a salon is a safer alternative to sunbathing. To combat the rising rate of melanoma, the most deadly form of skin cancer in the United States, Congresswoman Maloney introduced the Tanning Accountability and Notification (TAN) Act, which would require the Food and Drug Administration to determine whether the current labeling of indoor tanning beds provides sufficient information about the risks associated with indoor tanning.

The language of the TAN Act was included in the Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act of 2007, Public Law 110-85 (FDAAA), Section 230 of FDAAA.  Based on this law the FDA amended the warning label requirements for sunlamp products to include specific formatting requirements to more clearly and effectively convey the risks that these devices pose for the development of irreversible damage to the eyes and skin, including skin cancer.  The new label directly states “DANGER-Ultraviolet radiation…Repeated exposure may cause premature aging of the skin and skin cancer.”  This was an important step toward reducing the risks of these devices with the end goal of reducing the rising rates of skin cancer.

According to the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD), almost 30 million Americans visit indoor tanning salons each year- 70% of visitors are women between the ages of 16 and 49. More than 25% of teen girls have used tanning salons three or more times in their lives. One of the reported side effects of indoor tanning is an elevated risk of skin cancer. According to the AAD, regular tanning bed use was associated with a 55% increase in the risk of developing melanoma, especially in women between the ages of 20 and 29. As a result, dermatologists have concluded that indoor tanning is not safe. The FDA and numerous leading United States and international health care organizations have expressed concerns that the consuming public is not aware indoor tanning devices emit ultraviolet radiation that is similar to and sometimes more powerful than UV radiation emitted by the sun. It is clear that Americans are not aware indoor tanning is dangerous.

 

For more information on legislation and related documents click here.

More on Skin Cancer Prevention

Sep 13, 2016 Press Release

WASHINGTON, DC – Today, Congresswoman Carolyn B. Maloney (NY-12), Skin Cancer Caucus co-chair, joined with Congressman Charlie Dent (PA-15) as well as Representatives David Joyce, Rosa DeLauro, and Evan Jenkins to introduce a resolution in support of state, local and community-level initiatives encouraging caregivers to take preventative measures against sunburns in the minors under their care.

Mar 22, 2016 In The News

Members of the House are pushing the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to issue a final rule banning indoor tanning for anyone under the age of 18.

Reps. Carolyn Maloney (D-N.Y.), Charles Dent (R-Pa.), Rosa DeLauro (D-Conn.), and Ted Lieu (D- Calif.) led 18 of their colleagues in a letter Friday urging FDA Commissioner Robert Califf to finalize the rule “as soon as possible.”

Mar 21, 2016 Press Release

Representatives Carolyn B. Maloney (NY-12), Charles W. Dent (PA-15), Rosa DeLauro (CT-03), and Ted Lieu (CA-33) led 23 of their colleagues on a letter to Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Robert Califf Friday calling for swift approval of the agency’s recent proposal to place an age 18 minimum on the use of indoor tanning devices.

Dec 18, 2015 Press Release

WASHINGTONRep. Carolyn B. Maloney (NY-12), co-founder and co-chair of the Congressional Skin Cancer Caucus, hailed the Food and Drug Administration’s announcement today of a proposed rule to restrict the use of tanning beds to those 18 and older. Maloney called on the FDA in 2014 to ban tanning beds for minors and led the fight in Congress to reclassify tanning beds as Class II medical devices.

Jun 30, 2015 Press Release

WASHINGTON – Chairwoman of the Congressional Skin Cancer Caucus Congresswoman Carolyn B. Maloney (D-NY) this week joined Congressman Ted Lieu and 16 other  House members in urging the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) to take action on a proposed FDA rule that would restrict indoor tanning by children under 18. Maloney first urged the FDA to adopt such a rule in a letter to then FDA Commissioner Margaret Hamburg in June 2014.

Apr 8, 2015 Press Release

WASHINGTON – Congresswoman Carolyn B. Maloney (D-NY) today urged the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to move forward with a proposal to ban the use of tanning beds by minors. Maloney first called for the restriction in a letter to FDA in June 2014.

Dec 30, 2014 Press Release

NEW YORK -- Congresswoman Carolyn B. Maloney (D-NY) today urged Surgeon General Vivek H. Murthy to take action on gun violence and other public health issues. In her letter, Maloney called for better efforts to understand gun violence and continued action in addressing skin cancer.

Dec 18, 2014 Press Release

WASHINGTON, D.C. -- Today Reps. Henry A. Waxman, Frank Pallone, Jr., Rosa L. DeLauro, Carolyn B. Maloney, and Charles W.

Nov 14, 2014 Press Release

Washington, DC. Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney (NY-12), co-chair of the Congressional Skin Cancer Caucus, lauded the unanimous House approval of the Sunscreen Innovation Act (S. 2141), bipartisan legislation to pave the way for more effective sunscreen products. Maloney was a cosponsor of the House version, H.R. 4250.

Jul 29, 2014 Press Release

WASHINGTON – Congresswoman Carolyn B. Maloney (D-NY) today applauded the Surgeon General’s call to action on skin cancer. Last year, Maloney established the bipartisan Congressional Skin Cancer Caucus. Maloney also succeeded in passing legislation in 2007 which led to the Food and Drug Administration’s recent decision to reclassify UV tanning lamps as Class II medical devices, necessitating warning labels indicating the products should not be used by those under 18 years old.

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